How To Gain Muscle: Part III

I worked out hard yesterday!

If you’ve followed the last few posts, you know that I have been focusing on a problem that many people with cystic fibrosis face as they get older.  First, let me say that it’s not just us! Even a “normal” person with no lung disease begins to lose muscle mass at a rate of about 1% per year in his or her 40’s. This loss (also called sarcopenia) then speeds up and can reach 2% per year in the 50’s and beyond.  Of course, the more you start off with at year 40, the better off you will be at age 60 or 70.  The causes of this muscle loss are numerous, and include lack of exercise, poor diet, inflammation, and hormonal changes. To this list, cystic fibrosis patients can add steroid use, poor absorption of nutrients, and numerous hospitalizations leading to even further lack of movement.  So what’s a body to do?

Well, this is exactly why I am writing this series.  It is important to take muscle gain seriously and in a timely fashion.  Don’t wait until you are a skinny fifty year old!  However, if you ARE a skinny fifty year old, first of all, congratulations!  Second of all, it’s not too late.  Get going now!  At least you can slow the loss of muscle tissue by using it.

Alright, off the soapbox.  On to the content… As you read here and here, rule number one if you want to gain muscle is to pick a good, well designed weight training program and follow it. Rule number two was to increase your caloric intake; specifically, to increase your protein intake.  The last rule is to allow your muscles to recover!

There is no faster way to sabotage yourself that to decide that more must be better.  More is definitely not better when it comes to lifting weights as a weight gain strategy.  It is definitely the way to go if you want to overtrain and get so burned out that you either 1) get sick, or 2) end up hating the gym.

Your muscle tissue needs two things to recover from  a resistance workout.  It needs food, specifically carbohydrate and protein.  It is best to get these in a ratio of 3 or 4 to 1.  So for example, I drink a protein shake with 20 gm of whey protein and 60 to 80 gm of carbs in the form of berries, coconut milk and a banana.  A simpler option is a big glass of chocolate milk. Ideally, you want to feed this delicacy to your starving muscles as soon as you can after a workout.  I shoot for drinking my shake within 30 to 60 minutes after my last set.  The reason for this is that the muscle cells are primed to transport both glucose and amino acids immediately following exercise.  They are primed because they need these nutrients to recover; glucose to replace the lost glycogen stores, and amino acids to rebuild the contractile proteins that were damaged by the exercise (don’t worry, the damage is a good thing as the muscle is rebuilt stronger and bigger).

The other thing your muscle tissue needs is time off. This is why good programs tell you to rest at least one day between sessions that work the same muscles. You cannot work a muscle every day and expect it to grow.  Muscle is built while you rest, not while you train. Therefore, no rest = no building…only tearing down.  If you work legs on Monday, rest them on Tuesday.  If you must do something, work your upper body instead.  If you have a hard, full-body workout on Monday, take Tuesday completely off.  It’s ok!  Go for a walk.  Walking doesn’t count…it is not resistance exercise.  It is simply moving…which we are made for and need to do.  Finally, if you do not get enough good quality sleep, forget it.  Sleep is right up there with food.  Sleep is when the cellular trash is taken out, and new proteins are built. It is the time to grow.  It is also necessary to get enough sleep so that all of your hard work is not completely overruled by increased stress hormones as a result of too little sleep. Eight hours is a minimum!

Here’s the formula in a nutshell: Workout. Eat to recover. Chill out the next day (but go for a walk!). Sleep a TON.  Repeat.

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Comments

One Response to “How To Gain Muscle: Part III”
  1. Mark says:

    Thank you Julie. I’ve been quite daunted by the sheer volume of articles online about muscle building and how to translate them for my body chemistry.

    I’m a 27 year-old post-transplant Male CF-er looking to build up muscle mass and found this very helpful

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