The Slight Edge

I’m currently reading a book called “The Slight Edge,” by Jeff Olson. The basic message is that significant change is made quite easily if taken one small and consistent step at a time. As a wellness coach, I have read quite a bit about change psychology, and the directness and simplicity of this author’s approach is very appealing to me. I’ve decided to take it on a test drive, and am trying to revive my blog with this approach. When I first started blogging, I loved doing it and felt like it was an awesome way to get my message(s) out about living well despite having ongoing and serious health concerns. Then, life got in the way, and blogging took a back seat to just about everything else that I could think of. Enter the Slight Edge.  I will be posting more.

It seems to me that life is somewhat unfair in that good habits seem to require effort to develop, while bad habits form quite easily simply by being unconscious about choices we make.  The Slight Edge basically refutes this, by making the very obvious point that over time, simply taking one small action each day will compound into huge and lasting change.  On the other hand, not taking that one action will also compound.  Unfortunately, compounding in this negative sense can be disastrous.

A very clear example for the cystic fibrosis peeps out there is doing your daily aerosol treatments.  These are very easy to do (note that I didn’t say “convenient” or “pleasant”).  Seriously…you just sit and inhale stuff.  It’s not like you aren’t going to inhale anyway!  And sitting in a chair holding a nebulizer is not exactly manual labor.  So it’s easy to do treatments.

But it is also very easy to blow them off.  There are a myriad of things that, in the moment, seem way more important than that hypertonic saline, right?  Sleeping in, stopping for coffee before work, playing with your cat, browsing favorite websites, cleaning your closets, plucking your eyebrows…you name it.  Who wants to sit and cough?

But now imagine what happens if that decision to blow off your treatments is compounded, day after day.  Then compare that image to what it looks like if you make that simple decision to do the treatments every day.  Stretch your imagination out to a month or two (here is where I wish you were a pathologist, because my mental image is a slide of healthy, pristine lung tissue vs. nastiness on a slide).  Two very, very different images as a result of two sides of a decisional coin, compounded over time.

Of course, this relates to just about any area of life…not just medical treatments.  Decisions about fitness habits, what you eat or drink, how you relate to people, how you work, and how you deal with stress all compound over time this way.  On a day-to-day basis, it doesn’t matter in a huge way whether you take your daily walk or sit for your meditation.  Not doing them ONE day is easy, and it won’t make a dent in your overall fitness or stress level.  Alternately, actually doing these things probably aren’t going to matter a huge amount on that particular day. But compound these decisions over time and see what happens.

What one life-enhancing thing, something that is both very easy to do but also very easy to blow off, can you to do, today and every day?  Gotta go do my saline now.

 

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